I'm in Control


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Order                           -                      Chaos
Mono                           -                      Poly


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Introspection's course and limits were set by a consciousness that insisted on unity.

To hear the deeps not only affronted Christian tradition; it invited what had been declared the Devil, Hell, and madness.

Today we call the internal policing of the psyche by an inspectio become inspector general 'mind control.'

Here we begin to see the staggering consequences of denial of the daimons: it leaves the psyche bereft of all persons but the ego, the controller who becomes super-ego.

No spontaneous fantasy, image, or feeling may be independent of this unified ego. Every psychic happening becomes 'mine.' Know Thyself shifts to Know Myself.

What Philemon taught Jung, however, was that there are things in the psyche that are no more "mine" than animals in the forest ... or birds in the air." Moreover, without images, the imaginative perspective itself withers, only reinforcing the ego's literalism.

The images which could teach the ego its limits, as Philemon taught Jung, having been repressed, only return unimaged as archetypal delusions in the midst of subjective consciousness itself. The ego becomes demonic. It fully believes in its own power.

[James Hillman]
Healing Fiction, p.65

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[...] when you are suffering, when there's failure, dejection, and you are cast down, thrown back on yourself, left alone, wet, in one way or another - then you begin to feel, Who am I? What is going on? Why can't I? Why doesn't my will work?

The Great Western Will - that I have been trained ever since I was a child to know what I want, to get it, and do it. To be independent!

It doesn't matter whether you're a man or a woman here. You're taught to be independent, to stand on your own two feet, to take what you need, to know what you want, and to know where you're going.

Now all of that gets defeated by the syndromes or the symptoms I'm talking about, the pathologizing. Suicide is one. Betrayal is one. Masturbation is another one [...]

[James Hillman]
Inter Views, p.12

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There's a necessary inferiority when you're in psychic reality.

[...] soul means inferiority - something sensitive, something ... well ... pathologized. Soul makes the ego feel uncomfortable, uncertain, lost. And that lostness is a sign of soul.

You couldn't have soul or be a soul if you couldn't feel that you have lost it.

The person is the strong ego, as it's called, doesn't feel that he's lost anything.

That's one reason I question the psychiatric process of developing a strong ego. That seems to me a monstrous goal for psychotherapy because it attempts to overcome the sense of soul which appears as weakness, a weakness that seems almost to require symptoms.

Violence or power or sadism or domination keep us from sensing soul, and until they crack from inside, don't work anymore, fall apart, as I have called it, we can't work with them.

[James Hillman]
Inter Views, p.17

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Generative forms in general are multi-centered. 

There's not a single chain of command which runs from the top of the pyramid to the rank and file below. There are many, many, many web-like modes which become more or less active.

You might notice the resemblance here to the difference between broadcasting and the Internet, for example.

[Brian Eno]
'Evolving metaphors, in my opinion, is what artists do'


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Related posts:-
Soul Possession
Reasonable Paths
Small Mind/Large Mind
Balancing Art
Devils in the Dark
Monotheism & Polytheism
An Orderly Mind 
Do you have control (or does control have you?) 
Step toward Madness 
Pressure Valve 
Wild Things
Shades of gray

5 comments:

  1. He stays always within the archetypal perspective of philosophy with its commitment to coherent unity. His ennobled notion of man affirms, and inflates, the ego reflecting this transcendent unity, an ego which must see multiplication only as fragmentation.

    [Karl] Jaspers well perceives the dangers of demonology, but not its prospective possibility for releasing the soul from its history of ego domination. Because Jaspers treats the question metaphysically, in the language of 'is' verbs, ("are there demons or not"), for him the issue is one of substance and being.

    Were it treated psychologically, the daimons would be considered first as experiences, personified perspectives toward events, and demonology as a mode of imagining. But to approach the issue in this fashion, psychologically, requires an appreciation of the image, and anima.

    [James_Hillman]
    Healing Fiction, p.67

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  2. [...] there is humility, and I propose this not as a moral principle, distasteful to a large number of people, but simply as an item of a scientific philosophy.

    In the period of the Industrial Revolution, perhaps the most important disaster was the enormous increase of scientific arrogance. We had discovered how to make trains and other machines. We knew how to put one box on top of the other to get that apple, and Occidental man saw himself as an autocrat with complete power over a universe which was made of physics and chemistry.

    But that arrogant scientific philosophy is now obsolete, and in its place there is the discovery that man is only a part of larger systems and that the part can never control the whole.

    [Gregory Bateson]
    Steps to an Ecology of Mind ('Conscious Purpose versus Nature'), p.443

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  3. The body, that inconvenient reminder of mortality, is plucked, pierced, etched, pummelled, pumped up, shrunk and remoulded [...] What seems a celebration of the body, then, may also cloak a virulent anti-materialism - a desire to gather this raw, perishable stuff into the less corruptible forms of art or discourse.

    The resurrection of the body returns as the tattoo parlour and the cosmetic surgeon's consulting-room. To reduce this obstreperous stuff to so much clay in our hands is a fantasy of mastering the unmasterable. It is a disavowal of death, a refusal of the limit which is ourselves.

    For all its love affair with matter, in the shape of Tuscan villas and double brandies, capitalist society harbours a secret hatred of the stuff. It is a culture shot through with fantasy, idealist to its core, powered by a disembodied will which dreams of pounding Nature to pieces. It makes an idol out of matter, but cannot stomach the resistance it offers to its grandiose schemes.

    Taming the Mississippi and piercing your navel are just earlier and later versions of the same ideology. Having moulded the landscape to our own image and likeness, we have now begun to recraft ourselves. Civil engineering has been joined by cosmetic surgery.

    'Personalizing' the body may be a way of denying its essential impersonality. Its impersonality lies in the fact that it belongs to the species before it belongs to me; and there are some aspects of the species-body - death, vulnerability, sickness and the like - that we may well prefer to thrust into oblivion.

    [Terry Eagleton]
    After Theory, p.164-6

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  4. Adam and Eve then became almost drunk with excitement. This was the way to do things. Make a plan, ABC and you get D.

    They then began to specialize in doing things the planned way. In effect, they cast out from the Garden the concept of their own systemic nature and of its total systemic nature.

    [...] Eve began to resent the business of sex and reproduction. Whenever these rather basic phenomena intruded upon her now purposive way of living, she was reminded of the larger life which had been kicked out of the Garden.

    [Gregory Bateson]
    Steps to an Ecology of Mind ('Conscious Purpose versus Nature'), p.441

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  5. Our natural "uncontrollable" urges - much like products of the unconscious; dreams, pathologies - serve to remind us of the larger mind/system.

    They are uncomfortable because they go against our plans, run counter to the purposiveness of the ego. They counteract our imaginings, our fictions, and point towards the artificial nature of our act.

    They bring us back down to the ground (back down the pyramid of meanings, of meta) and humble us with the truth of our larger nature.

    These things insult the ego, put it in its place; and so, mostly, we resent them.

    ReplyDelete