The Game Goes On: Lessons from The Wire


The faces change but the roles remain the same. The game goes on.
For 'real' change we must change that which creates the roles, sets the rules: the system.

Lester works his way up the hierarchy - the pyramid - 'following the money,' hoping to find the puppet-master, see the wizard. But if he goes high enough what he will find is that even the highest player is contained by the pyramid itself. All heads butt against the same ceiling.

The wizard is nothing more than a fanciful idea based on short-sighted thinking. The pyramid - that is, the structure that surrounds them all - is his real enemy. Whilst his targets remain players then he is merely playing a game, albeit for higher and higher stakes. Because any position within the pyramid can be replaced, and will be. Bust one, and another surfaces.

An idealist is one that sees the pyramid - i.e. the larger picture
A pragmatist is one that sees the players - i.e. the near view.

The Wire has its share of idealists - McNulty, Colvin, Lester - those who are thwarted by the crushing pragmatism that surrounds them - but none of them are ideal enough. In the end, all have their own games to play. None of them take their battle to the pyramid.

It is amazing that The Wire can enjoy such popularity and yet its lessons go largely unheeded. We still go on looking at the layers whilst ignoring the system that contains them; believing that by voting for this or that politician, or by busting this or that person we will really change things.

Really, it should come as no surprise. We are a society that is in thrall to pragmatism. When a party or a figurehead falls and is replaced it represents a victory. Pragmatic eyes see change and a new dawn. But they are short-sighted, and cannot see any further than the immediate players. They are not attuned to the long-view. The idealist sees that it is nothing more than a changing of the guards.

One plays the short game, one the long. A society needs both, and each has its place and time. 

If we truly want change - that is, the long-term sort that Lester and his like seemed to be after - then we must look beyond players. This is the resounding lesson of the Wire. Its final shots couldn't make it any more clear: the old roles remain, only with new faces. Michael becomes Omar, Carver becomes Colvin, Sidner becomes McNulty ... the game goes on.

For all that 'change', nothing is really different.


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[...] in our situation we're all powerless.

I mean, we pretend we're run by people. We're not run by anybody. The secret of modern Britain is there is no power anywhere."

Some commentators, he says, think we're run by an oligarchy. "But we're not. I mean, nobody can see power in Britain. The politicians think journalists have power. The journalists know they don't have any. Then they think the bankers have power. The bankers know they don't have any. None of them have any power.

[Rory Stewart]
'The secret of modern Britain is there is no power anywhere'


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Related posts:-
The Pyramid
Restrictive Systems 
Part of a System  
Small Mind/Large Mind
Digging Deeper 
Structural Integrity
Status Quo 
You or The Work
A Higher Power
Do Not Disturb
Break Down
Only Playing
Short term v Long term
The Devil is in the Details (and God is in the Generalities)
 

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