Devils in the Dark

All those allegedly accidental inhibitions, fancies, moods, vague feelings, and scraps of fantasy that hinder concentration and disturb the peace of mind even of the most normal man, and that are rationalized away as being due to bodily causes and suchlike, usually have their origin, not in the reasons consciously ascribed to them, but in perceptions of unconscious processes.

One man will not allow himself to be disturbed in the slightest by his inner processes - he can ignore them completely; another man is just as completely at their mercy - as soon as he wakes up some fantasy or other, or a disagreeable feeling, spoils his mood for the whole day; a vaguely unpleasant sensation puts the idea into his head that he is suffering from a secret disease, a dream fills him with gloomy forebodings ...

[C.G. Jung]
The Essential Jung, p.99, 100

................................................................................................................................................................................


Complex

[...] a conglomeration of psychic contents characterized by a peculiar or perhaps painful feeling-tone, something that is usually hidden from sight. It is as though a projectile struck through the thick layer of the persona into the dark layer. For instance, someone with a money complex will be hit when you say: "To buy," "to pay," or "money." That is a disturbance of reaction.

Complexes behave like Descartes' devils and seem to delight in playing impish tricks. They slip just the wrong word into one's mouth, they make one forget the name of the person one is about to introduce, they cause a tickle in the throat just when the softest passage is being played on the piano at a concert, they make the tiptoeing latecomer trip over a chair with a resounding crash. They bid us congratulate the mourners at a burial instead of condoling with them, they are the instigators of all those maddening things which F. T. Vischer attributed to the "mischievousness of the object."

[C.G. Jung]
The Essential Jung, p.34, 39


................................................................................................................................................................................


A great number of apparently insoluble problems disappear at once if we decide to give up the notion that the motives by which people believe themselves to be motivated are necessarily the ones which actually drive them to act, feel, and think as they do.

[Erich Fromm]
The Fear of Freedom, p.118


................................................................................................................................................................................

Related posts:-
All ego?

No comments:

Post a Comment