Creative Partnerships

What is the other, the partner? He is never something static; he is life, development, past, present and future. To comprehend another person means relating not only to his present but to his past and his future.

Relationship always involves something creative. In using the word "creative," I mean the following: The human psyche is always full of new possibilities. It is constantly re-creating itself, so to speak, and is perpetually being re-created. An individual's psychic potential is limited, of course, but it is highly varied and many-faceted.

When we meet someone, it is unrelated and uncreative to see him as a snapshot, a fixed image.  

To encounter a person creatively means to weave fantasies around him, to circle around his potential.

Various images arise about the person and the potential relationship to him. Such creative fantasies are often quite far removed from so-called reality; they are as unreal, and as true, as fairy tales and myths. They use imaginative images to grasp the nature of the other person.

Even if they are not expressed, fantasies also influence the other person, awakening new living potential in him [They] are related to the nature of the other person; they represent, in symbolic-mythological form, his life potential.

These creative fantasies, this imaginative circumambulating of one's partner, are of the greatest importance in every human relationship [...] 

Everyone needs to fantasy about himself, to circle about and awaken his own potential in mythological or fairy tale form.

[Adolf Guggenb├╝hl-Craig]
Power In The Helping Professions, p.45-7

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2 comments:

  1. Love sees potentialities, and actualizes potentialities.

    [Abraham Maslow]

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  2. [...] if there are no pronounced family fantasies, the drama doesn't work, and we flounder about in that strangely loveless limbo that psychology calls an "identity crisis."

    Family love expresses itself by means of these fantasies of "what I want you to become" and "what I am proud of you for." These fantasies of identity show that someone is noticing traits, habits, styles. Whether a person lives into the myth or rebels against it, there must first be a myth.

    [James Hillman]
    A Blue Fire, p.198

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